This Way To Merthyr Road

This is the point where the A470 is about to become Merthyr Road for the first time as you head north. According to Google Maps, this is also the only stretch of the A470 that carries the name of Merthyr Road.

Behind me is the Gabalfa roundabout and flyover, with the A48 running underneath it, which is the subject of a separate blog post.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Where Do The Gates Go?

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My choice today is another photo I’d normally never have the opportunity to shoot. With the water level in the reservoir unusually low, we were able to walk out along the reservoir wall to the sluice gates. I’m the kind of person who sees something you’re normally not allowed or able to visit, and wonders where it goes, and what it looks like. This photo does absolutely nothing to answer those questions, but I like the mystery it projects too much 🙂

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Royal Oak, Pontypridd

The Royal Oak, at the southern end of Cilfynydd, is today best known for its Chinese restaurant and take-away. I can certainly vouch for their omelettes, although I must admit in recent weeks my favourite has been the sweet and sour chicken strips. Perfect when I’m home late from work and we’re both too tired to face the cooker!

I haven’t been able to find out much about when the Royal Oak was built. There’s mention of a Royal Oak pub in Glyntaf in the 1891 census, but unfortunately the accompanying images are behind a paywall (grrr – the National Archives website sends you to a commercial firm’s website which charges for access), so I can’t confirm whether this is the same pub or not. Like many of the properties along the A4054 through Cilfynydd, the Royal Oak would have backed onto the Glamorganshire Canal before it was closed.

If you can cast any light on the history of the Royal Oak, please leave a comment below.

References:

http://yourarchives.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php?title=Place:Pontypridd_Registration_District%2C_1891_Census_Street_Index_P-R

Copyright (c) 2010 Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all).

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The Sluice Gates At Llwyn Onn Reservoir

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My choice of desktop wallpaper today continues this week’s theme about low water levels in the local reservoir. The water levels were low enough that we felt safe walking out along the reservoir wall to go and take a very close look at the sluice gates themselves. You can see just how close we got from this somewhat abstract shot.

By deliberately placing the focus on the front of one of the metal bars, and using a very shallow depth of field, I’ve made the whole thing look like it’s just a bit out of reach, which makes it a great image to have sat behind my desktop icons for the day.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Un Stella Artois, S'il Vous Plait

Seen abandoned outside Cardiff University.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Beach at Llwyn Onn

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My choice of desktop wallpaper today continues my theme about the water levels of one of the reservoirs in South Wales. As you can hopefully see from this shot, the northern end of the Llwyn Onn Reservoir has been completely exposed by the retreating waters, and is drying out and cracking up quite nicely.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Maltsters Arms is a public house in Pontypridd known to date back to at least 1858. It is believed to sit on the site of the original earthen house from which Pontypridd takes its welsh name (Pont-y-tŷ-pridd – the bridge by the earthen house).

Maltsters Arms

Maltsters Arms

My strong memory of the Maltsters Arms is walking by over the bridge on an evening and hearing the live music that is often being performed down in its cellar room. The cellar room opens out onto a stone patio beside the River Taff.

References:

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/wal/GLA/LlantwitFardre/Slaters-Pontypridd.html
http://wikitravel.org/en/Pontypridd

Copyright (c) 2010 Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all).

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Pont yr Daf Revealed By Drought

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For this week’s theme, I had originally planned (and uploaded; they’re in my Flickr photo stream if you want a sneak peak) some macro shots taken around the house, but that will have to wait.

Thursday last week, I think it was, I saw a newspaper headline about impending drought and water shortages. That seemed odd, thought I, remembering how full the Welsh reservoirs had been earlier in the year, and thought nothing more of it. Then, on Saturday, I saw these photos on Flickr by trelewis of an old bridge normally hidden beneath the reservoir waters at Llwyn Onn.

So on Sunday afternoon, Kristi and I went up to see for ourselves. Given that it’s only mid-June, with the summer months still to come, the reservoir levels are very low indeed, and I changed my mind for this week’s theme and decided to share with you some of the shots I took, shots that normally simply aren’t possible. There’ll be more shots each day this week, and on Saturday I’ll publish the full set here on this blog.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Open Monday at 1pm

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It’s Friday (woohoo!) and my desktop wallpaper today definitely has that in mind. With the World Cup on, I’m sure many of us wish we could shutter the shop for a few days and crowd round the telly with a few beers. So I hope this wallpaper helps you pretend, just for a little while, that you’ve been able to do exactly that, and I’ll be back on Monday with a new theme for a new week of daily desktop wallpaper.

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The Chain Link Arches were a public art installation beneath Brunel’s impressive viaduct across the River Rhondda in Pontypridd in 2010. Consisting of coloured floodlights that lit up the underside of the arches as dusk turned to night, they made a somewhat eerie sight.

Chain Link Arches

Chain Link Arches

Chain Link Arches

Although I can’t find any reference to it online, and unfortunately RCT’s own website doesn’t leave old news articles published (grrrr), I’ve a memory of reading that this was conceived along with Unity to help promote Pontypridd. I must be mistaken on that part, because the Chain Link Arches have so few hits on Google that it is as if no-one knew it was there 🙁

Unfortunately, I’ve been unable to find out anything more about this piece of art. If you know who the artist was, when it was first installed, and when it was finally removed, I’d love to hear from you in the comments below!

Copyright (c) 2010 Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all).

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