Mumbles Lighthouse

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Picking today’s choice of wallpaper has probably been my hardest decision yet since I started blogging about my wallpaper choice, but when it comes to a HDR shot to remember my Nikon D200 by, this is right up there at the very top along with the Calanais At Dusk shot.

This shot was my wallpaper for months, and I’m pretty sure I’ve still got an old Windows XP virtual machine lying around where this shot still is the desktop wallpaper of choice. And, just like the Calanais shot, it was a happy accident … five frames shot towards the end of a long day that, together, managed to capture something a little bit magical.

Well, that’s it … that’s the end of my two-week theme looking at just some of my favourite shots taken with the Nikon D200 that I finally sold recently. It was a faithful companion, and I can’t begin to describe just how much pleasure it brought me over the years.

Come back tomorrow for an extra article … 40 of my all-time favourite shots taken with the Nikon D200, and 40 of the shots my wonderful audience has chosen as their favourites.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Whitchurch Railway Station

Viewed from the bridge that carries the A470 over the Coryton Line, Whitchurch Railway Station looks a sleepy little station well buried amongst greenery.

Whitchurch Railway Station

Looking west along the tracks, you can clearly see the bridge that carries the A470 over the track, and the odd little kink in the track as it approaches Coryton Railway Station just out of shot.

Whitchurch Railway Station

The station itself is small and functional. Unlike some of its neighbours, it has no CCTV cameras at the time of writing.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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South Towards Pontypridd

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As the end of the week approaches, and time runs out to pick out HDR shots in tribute to my Nikon D200, it’s getting harder and harder to pick my wallpaper choice, I don’t mind admitting! But there was no way I could leave this shot out of my selection. For me, like my Calanais At Dusk shot that’s sadly the wrong aspect to ever be a Daily Desktop Wallpaper (but, do try it on an iPad … it’s the wallpaper for the lock screen on mine!), this shot is an example of what HDR can really achieve when it all comes together. The end result looks more like a painting than a photograph, and I could happily stare at it all day.

In fact, that’s exactly what I’m going to do! At least until tomorrow, when I’ll be sharing my last choice from the D200 HDR archives.

Oh, and tonight I’m planning on working on the shots for next week’s wallpaper theme. Mrs H has set me a photographic challenge. I’ve no idea how it will go, but I’m looking forward to doing something a little different (for me). If there’s a photographic challenge you’d like to set me for a future wallpaper theme, drop me a comment on my blog and I’ll certainly consider it 🙂

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Keep Clear At All Times

A pub rear entrance just off Westgate Street.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

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Cadw Shop, Harlech Castle

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This week’s theme continues my personal tribute to my beloved Nikon D200, which I recently sold after many happy years of snapping; in particular, I’m showcasing some of the popular HDR photos that I took with the camera over the years. There are just too many photos to feature them all (but come back Saturday to see how I solve that one …)

Harlech Castle, in the care of Cadw, is (along with quite a bit of the North Welsh coast) a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s a stunning castle to visit in its own right, and a great place to enjoy an open-air concert, but if you ever go there, make sure you take the time to pause and enjoy its setting. Gaze out onto the beautiful mountains, and try to imagine how this might have looked back in the days when there was a garrison but no modern roads or railway tracks or golf courses.

Simply beautiful.

I’ll be back tomorrow with another of my choices from the popular HDR photos I’ve taken with the Nikon D200.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Sorry Remains Of Brighton West Pier

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My choice of desktop wallpaper today continues the theme of showcasing popular HDR photos taken with my Nikon D200, as a tribute to the camera that I recently sold.

Today’s choice is this iconic English scene: the sorry remains of Brighton Pier. Mrs H and I are visitors to Brighton from time to time, as lovers of both sushi and collectable nihonto, and eventually on one trip we had the time to explore the western end of the sea front a bit to finally see the remains of the pier for ourselves. Like nearly all of my HDR shots, it’s handheld rather than done with a tripod, and shot with varying aperture to give it that slightly-odd feel.

I hope you’ll be back tomorrow for another of my popular HDR photos.

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Under Construction: Cardiff Food Festival

I enjoyed greatly the juxtaposition of the distant construction crane and the much nearer Torchwood Towers during a visit to the Cardiff Food Festival.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

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The Deserted Beaches Of Harris - HDR

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Good morning! It’s a beautiful morning over here in Bath (where I work) today, and that has inspired me for this morning’s first pick of the D200 HDR photos that I want to share with you this week.

We fell in love with the Isle of Lewis and Harris off the west coast of Scotland during our visit in 2007. It is such a beautiful and friendly place to visit; we could happily have stayed there for much longer than the two weeks we could afford. One of the many delights of Harris are the sandy white beaches, where we spent many a happy hour enjoying the emptiness of the place. The perfect scene to look out on during a Monday in any office!

There’ll be another popular HDR photo as part of my Nikon D200 tribute tomorrow.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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One of the great pleasures of visiting Cardiff is taking a stroll through Alexandra Gardens, part of Cathays Park.

Standing at the heart of Cardiff’s historic civic centre, Alexandra Gardens is overlooked by law courts, university buildings, police station, national museum, local and welsh government offices, and the falcons that nest in the clock tower. It is a legacy of the wealth extracted from the valleys to the north and brought down to the docks by canal and competing railways.

It’s also one of the cheapest and most convenient places to park your car in Cardiff, if you happen to be a local who knows such things. And that’s why I found myself wandering through the park back in March 2010, trying out my new Nikon 35mm lens for the first time on my way to meet some fellow bloggers and the Guardian Cardiff correspondent at a pub in the centre of the city.

The Photos

The Cenotaph

Late March is a great time to photograph Cathays Park, as the low sun has just enough colour in it to bring the portland stone to life.

Words On The Cenotaph

I’m afraid I can’t translate the inscription that runs around the top of the cenotaph. If you can, please leave a translation in the comments.

Graffiti On A Tree

The park is very popular with students from the University of Wales, Cardiff, which occupies many of the buildings that surround the park both to the east and the west.

Statues Inside The Cenotaph

This is the Welsh National War Memorial, unveiled in 1928, as a remembrance to soldiers, sailors and airmen who died in the Great War of 1914-1918. The statue on top represents Victory.

Gardens And City Hall

Looking south (with the Cenotaph behind me) across Alexandra Gardens towards the back of City Hall. Just out of picture, to the right, is the famous clock tower, currently home to nesting peregrine falcons.

Cardiff Centenary Walk Beside The Cenotaph

In 2005, a 41-point walk around the centre of Cardiff was created to celebrate 100 years of Cardiff officially being a city. Point 25 can be found beside the Welsh National War Memorial.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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