Boeing 707 Controls - Engine Throttles

Scotland’s National Museum of Flight is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

There’s something reassuringly solid about the engine throttles in the Boeing 707’s cockpit. It’s so easy to imagine slowly opening up the throttles and feeling like your own brawn is increasing the output of those engines. I expect that it was a very satisfying sensation each and every time the captain lined the aircraft up along the runway and then slowly moved those controls to get underway.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Boeing 707 Controls - Emergency Exit Lights

Scotland’s National Museum of Flight is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Everywhere you look in the cockpit they have on display at the museum, there are switches for everything. This is the pre-digital age. Just imagine the miles of wiring that must run behind all of the panels to connect each switch to the appropriate electrical circuit. Each one has to connected to the right place at both ends, or the safety of the passengers and crew is at risk.

Something to think about the next time you feel like complaining about the wires from your computer 🙂

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Boeing 707 Controls - Fuel Temp

Scotland’s National Museum of Flight is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

This Boeing 707 cockpit and front fuselage is the only one in the UK, and along with Concorde forms The Jet Age exhibit in Hangar 4. When you see the huge amount of gauges to read, dials to turn, and switches to flip, it really makes you respect the professionalism of the pilots and crew of that age. I’d hate to imagine today’s 5-minute-attention-span youth being asked to do something like that!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Boeing 707 Controls - Fuel Flow

Scotland’s National Museum of Flight is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Hangar 4 provides shelter for this Boeing 707 – the only one surviving in the UK. The cockpit itself is closed off behind a rather scratched piece of perspex, but there’s a narrow gap just wide enough to poke a lens through to take selective shots of the various controls that the crew used in the 1960’s to fly this aircraft.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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In the summer of 2009, Mrs H and I went on an ill-fated fortnight’s holiday in beautiful North Wales, basing ourselves just outside of Barmouth. Although some of the photos I took that fortnight have featured in my desktop wallpaper series, this is the first time that I’ve pulled together all the shots taken on holiday by theme.

We’d heard the whistle of the Cambrian steam train during our earlier walks in Barmouth, and jumped at the chance to ride on her ourselves. Had a great time and a lovely lunch in Porthmadog itself, and we both managed to pick up some more art of the house. (Which reminds me, I’m not sure where that ended up). On the way back, even the train conductor was complaining about how inaccurate the Met Office weather forecasts are for North Wales. I guess the view from out of their windows in their London offices just doesn’t quite reach out here …

Porthmadog Light Railway

Porthmadog Light Railway

Boats At Porthmadog

The Cambrian Arrives At Porthmadog

The Cambrian Arrives At Porthmadog

Harlech Castle From The Steam Train

Crew Of The Cambrian

The Cambrian At Barmouth

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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Half Way House, Edinburgh

This week’s theme is the streets of Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. I’ve only spent a day in Edinburgh with my camera to date, but instantly fell in love. It’s a much older city than Cardiff, with a richer history that the Scots have preserved in a way that the Welsh sadly haven’t. It’s also a much cleaner city than London, and in my experience the people are much friendlier too. There is much to explore through a lens, and I am looking forward to a longer stay there soon.

To finish off this week’s photos, and indeed the current theme of the streets of Edinburgh, what better way to end a Friday than with a pub. The Half Way House is very aptly named, as it is found half way up (or down, depending on your starting point!) a huge flight of stairs that form one of the alleys in Old Town. I admit, I chickened out on account of my crocked knee, and didn’t get to find out whether the assent / decent was worth it. Answers on a postcard, please (or in the comments below).

I hope you’ve enjoyed the last two weeks of photos from the streets of Edinburgh. I’ve got plenty more of these still to share with you for future weeks, so look out for them when I return to posting about this enchanting city later in the year.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The People's Story, Edinburgh

This week’s theme is the streets of Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. I’ve only spent a day in Edinburgh with my camera to date, but instantly fell in love. It’s a much older city than Cardiff, with a richer history that the Scots have preserved in a way that the Welsh sadly haven’t. It’s also a much cleaner city than London, and in my experience the people are much friendlier too. There is much to explore through a lens, and I am looking forward to a longer stay there soon.

This sign caught my eye whilst wandering around the city. It belongs to The People’s Story, a local museum that tells the story of the people of Edinburgh. Housed in the Canongate Tollbooth, a building dating back to 1591, it contains exhibitions about the lives of ordinary working people of the city.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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1884 Clock, Edinburgh

This week’s theme is the streets of Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. I’ve only spent a day in Edinburgh with my camera to date, but instantly fell in love. It’s a much older city than Cardiff, with a richer history that the Scots have preserved in a way that the Welsh sadly haven’t. It’s also a much cleaner city than London, and in my experience the people are much friendlier too. There is much to explore through a lens, and I am looking forward to a longer stay there soon.

One of the things I love about Edinburgh is just how much older it is than Cardiff. Take this clock for example, which appears to be dated to 1884 (taking the numbers at face value). Much of Cardiff – indeed, most of the South Wales industrial towns and cities – dates back only about a hundred years or so, to the height of the shipping boom … and for the last 20 years, Cardiff has been busy knocking down and replacing the buildings that replaced what went before. Edinburgh’s Old Town, by contrast, has plenty of buildings steeped in history, dating back much further, and maybe as a result, it doesn’t feel like the total architectural mess that Cardiff is becoming.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Law Firm Sign, Edinburgh

This week’s theme is the streets of Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. I’ve only spent a day in Edinburgh with my camera to date, but instantly fell in love. It’s a much older city than Cardiff, with a richer history that the Scots have preserved in a way that the Welsh sadly haven’t. It’s also a much cleaner city than London, and in my experience the people are much friendlier too. There is much to explore through a lens, and I am looking forward to a longer stay there soon.

I found this sign down one of the alleyways in Old Town; I think it was the Old Assembly Rooms, but I can’t be certain. Silly me for not taking a shot of the sign in its wider context, to remind myself of where exactly this was! I’m pretty sure it was the canopy above the entrance to a very prestigious-looking law firm. If you know more, please leave a comment below.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Writers Museum, Edinburgh

This week’s theme is the streets of Edinburgh, Scotland’s capital city. I’ve only spent a day in Edinburgh with my camera to date, but instantly fell in love. It’s a much older city than Cardiff, with a richer history that the Scots have preserved in a way that the Welsh sadly haven’t. It’s also a much cleaner city than London, and in my experience the people are much friendlier too. There is much to explore through a lens, and I am looking forward to a longer stay there soon.

If you find yourself wandering around the city, do pop down the various alleyways that spider off the Royal Mile, where you’ll find hidden delights like the Writers Museum. I love the sign outside … the idea of someone sitting formally at a desk, dressed to the nines, quill in hand; it’s such a long way from today, where writers grab whatever time they can on their laptops wherever they are.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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