Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Birchgrove Railway Station

From a distance, Birchgrove Railway Station seems to be doing its level best to hide beneath the nearby bridge.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking west along the Coryton Line tracks back towards Rhiwbina Railway Station and beyond ultimately to Coryton Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station, looking east along the platform. Note that Birchgrove hasn’t yet been the recipient of a shiny new shelter.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station is nestled right up against the A469, which carries traffic between Cardiff and Caerphilly. This photo looks east along the tracks towards Ty Glas Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking down from the A469 onto Birchgrove Railway Station platform.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Birchgrove Railway Station

From a distance, Birchgrove Railway Station seems to be doing its level best to hide beneath the nearby bridge.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking west along the Coryton Line tracks back towards Rhiwbina Railway Station and beyond ultimately to Coryton Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station, looking east along the platform. Note that Birchgrove hasn’t yet been the recipient of a shiny new shelter.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station is nestled right up against the A469, which carries traffic between Cardiff and Caerphilly. This photo looks east along the tracks towards Ty Glas Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking down from the A469 onto Birchgrove Railway Station platform.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

The Gabalfa Roundabout and Flyover marks the coming together of three of Cardiff’s most important road arteries: the A470 down from Merthyr Tydfil and junction 32 of the M4 motorway, the A469 down from Llanishen and Caerphilly, the A48 Western Avenue from Llandaff and Canton, and the A48 Eastern Avenue out to junction 29 of the M4. The roundabout and flyover were built during the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, around the same time as the A470 trunk road up to Merthyr Tydfil, and the Heath Hospital that is adjacent to the roundabout.

The Photos

Flyover Towards The City

For many drivers, travelling south into Cardiff from Caerphilly, Merthyr Tydfil, or just from Junction 32 of the M4 motorway, this is their main view of the Gabalfa roundabout: the flyover that takes you over the A48 and down towards Maindy and Cathays.

Flyover At Gabalfa Roundabout

Beside the flyover runs this sliproad that drivers use to go down to the Gabalfa roundabout. From here, you can go east onto the A48 and/or into the Heath Hospital, west onto the A48 Western Avenue towards the large Tescos and the turnings to Llandaff and Canton, or south down towards what eventually becomes City Road.

Cyclist in Silhouette

Because the A470 intersects north / south, and the A48 intersects east / west at the Gabalfa roundabout, there are pedestrian walkways across the roundabout, reached by subways like this one.

Approaching Gabalfa Roundabout

This shot shows the sliproad down to Gabalfa roundabout from the foot of the A469. It’s normally a little busier than this, but in recent months traffic around this area (and on the A470 into Cardiff) has seemed lighter to me, perhaps due to the very high price of petrol at this time.

Underside of the Flyover at Gabalfa Roundabout

The flyover at Gabalfa roundabout carries the A470 over the A48. It also carries the road over the pedestrian route across the roundabout too!

Above The A48 At Gabalfa Roundabout

The flyover at Gabalfa roundabout carries the A470 over this road, the A48. The A48 runs from junction 29 of the M4 in the east out to Culverhouse Cross in the west, making it one of the major arteries of Cardiff. It’s normally a little busier than is shown here.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

The Aneurin Bevan, Cardiff

This unusual building stands on the roundabout formed where the A470 down from Merthyr meets the A469 down from Caerphilly. It’s currently a Weatherspoon pub called the Aneurin Bevan after the founder of the National Health Service, but it is a site that frequently changes hands.

I’ve been unable to track down online anything about the older history of this site, and especially whether this building pre-dates the construction of the Gabalfa roundabout or not. If you know, please do let me know.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Latest Photos

Bridge Over The Falls
Avebury by Moonlight
Avebury by Moonlight
The North Face Of Corn Ddu
Corn Ddu and Llyn Cwm Llwch
Corn Ddu
Easter Cross
The North Route Up Pen-y-Fan
Cribyn
Remove Tape Before Firing

Categories

Archives

March 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031