Shipping Federation Limited

Mount Stuart Square, a designated conservation area since 1980, is home to something like 60 listed buildings. Some of these listed buildings are considered landmark buildings; some are not.

The crown jewel of Mount Stuart Square is the Coal Exchange, where the world’s first 1 million pound business transaction was conducted. Today, it’s a multi-purpose building, and a walk around the outside of it reveals gems like this fading sign for the Shipping Federation Limited. I haven’t had a lot of luck tracking down information about this former office, but my best guess is that it was the Cardiff office of the Shipping Federation, an association of shipping owners formed in 1890 to oppose what was originally known as the National Amalgamated Sailors’ and Firemen’s Union, which became the National Union of Seamen before it was swallowed up by the RMT in 1990.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Ty Glas Railway Station

Taken from the bridge that carries the A469 over the Coryton Line. Looking east towards Ty Glas Railway Station.

Ty Glas Railway Station

Looking west to Ty Glas Railway Station. Taken from the gate to the pedestrian crossing at the eastern end of the station.

Ty Glas Railway Station

Looking east along the Coryton Line. In the distance the track finally abandons its straight march across the north of Cardiff and starts to turn to the south, towards Heath Low Level Railway Station and beyond to Cardiff Queen Street.

Ty Glas Railway Station

Looking west, back towards Birchgrove Railway Station, which is immediately beyond the bridge in the distance.

Comms Tower Beside Ty Glas Station

This is the comms tower seen in the earlier shot to the immediate south of Ty Glas Railway Station.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Empire House

Mount Stuart Square, a designated conservation area since 1980, is home to something like 60 listed buildings. Some of these listed buildings are considered landmark buildings; some are not.

One of the ones which is listed is Empire House, designed by Percy Thomas. It was originally built for Evans & Reid Coal Company, one of the exporters who exported coal out through Cardiff Docks. It was built in 1926.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Birchgrove Railway Station

From a distance, Birchgrove Railway Station seems to be doing its level best to hide beneath the nearby bridge.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking west along the Coryton Line tracks back towards Rhiwbina Railway Station and beyond ultimately to Coryton Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station, looking east along the platform. Note that Birchgrove hasn’t yet been the recipient of a shiny new shelter.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station is nestled right up against the A469, which carries traffic between Cardiff and Caerphilly. This photo looks east along the tracks towards Ty Glas Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking down from the A469 onto Birchgrove Railway Station platform.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Birchgrove Railway Station

From a distance, Birchgrove Railway Station seems to be doing its level best to hide beneath the nearby bridge.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking west along the Coryton Line tracks back towards Rhiwbina Railway Station and beyond ultimately to Coryton Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station, looking east along the platform. Note that Birchgrove hasn’t yet been the recipient of a shiny new shelter.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Birchgrove Railway Station is nestled right up against the A469, which carries traffic between Cardiff and Caerphilly. This photo looks east along the tracks towards Ty Glas Railway Station.

Birchgrove Railway Station

Looking down from the A469 onto Birchgrove Railway Station platform.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Former Bank In Mount Stuart Square

Mount Stuart Square, a designated conservation area since 1980, is home to something like 60 listed buildings. Some of these listed buildings are considered landmark buildings; some are not.

One of those which isn’t is this building, No 1 Mount Stuart Square. Unfortunately, I haven’t managed to track down online what bank this originally was. If you happen to know, please leave a comment below!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Rhiwbina Railway Station

Taken from the footbridge over the Coryton Line at Rhiwbina Station, looking west towards Whitchurch Station. Note the CCTV camera perched high on the left in a commanding view along the platform – provided there isn’t a train there 🙂

Rhiwbina Railway Station

Looking east from the platform towards Birchgrove Railway Station, there isn’t much to be seen. There are local shops at the heart of Rhiwbina just off the bridge that you can see in the distance.

Rhiwbina Railway Station

There isn’t much more to be said about Rhiwbina Railway Station to be honest, except that I found it tidy and with a modern shelter for passengers enduring the long wait for a train.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Whitchurch Railway Station

Viewed from the bridge that carries the A470 over the Coryton Line, Whitchurch Railway Station looks a sleepy little station well buried amongst greenery.

Whitchurch Railway Station

Looking west along the tracks, you can clearly see the bridge that carries the A470 over the track, and the odd little kink in the track as it approaches Coryton Railway Station just out of shot.

Whitchurch Railway Station

The station itself is small and functional. Unlike some of its neighbours, it has no CCTV cameras at the time of writing.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

2 comments »

Earlier in 2010, I decided to spend a Sunday exploring the railway stations of the Coryton Line. This is the surviving section of the Bute’s Cardiff Railway, the last of the great railways built to bring coal down to the Cardiff docks. I’m sure I read somewhere that the Bute’s original intention was to run this railway along the route of the Glamorganshire Canal (which the Marquis had earlier bought), but that ultimately he wasn’t allowed to close the canal, and so had to come up with an alternative route for his railway.

Today, the Coryton Line is a single-track commuter run that swings east to west across the north of Cardiff. There are no services on a Sunday, making it the perfect day to explore these stations.

The Photos

Coryton Railway Station

This is the northern end of the Coryton Line, the surviving segment of the Cardiff Railway’s torturous (and ultimately unsuccessful) route up into the valleys in competition for carrying Rhondda and Merthyr coal.

Today, just beyond the fence, there’s a short (about 20 mins or so) but beautiful walk along the old trackbed up to Longwood Drive.

Coryton Railway Station

The bridge in the background carries the A4054 (the original Merthyr Road, before the A470 was built in the late 1960’s) over the old route of the Cardiff Railway.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Walnut Tree Viaduct

One of the surviving pillars (the one you can see from the A470) of the Walnut Tree Viaduct, reflected in the River Taff.

Built in 1901, the Walnut Tree Viaduct (so-called because it crossed the Taff Vale Railway above Walnut Tree Junction, at the southern end of modern-day Taffs Well) carried the Barry Railway 120 feet in the air across the Taff Gap from the Lesser Garth to the other side. What a view it must have been from up there, and certainly what a sight it was until it was dismantled in 1969.

References:

http://webapps.rhondda-cynon-taff.gov.uk/heritagetrail/taff/taffs_well/taffs_well.htm
http://www.flickr.com/photos/fray_bentos/362362405/

Copyright (c) 2010 Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »
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