Keeping An Eye On You

My wallpaper theme this week sees me return to posting photos closer to home, of distinctive images taken in and around Cardiff. Europe’s youngest capital city, Cardiff is an eclectic mix of the occasionally ancient, the Victorian and Georgian, and the mostly incongruous architecture of the last twenty years.

Definitely falling into the last category are both the St David’s 2 Shopping Centre in the background of this photo, and the CCTV camera hoisted up above the throngs of people heading to and from the new shops. It’s a dirty job, as we can see by the condition of this camera (which might only be a couple of years old) but someone has to do it.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Project 25×9, because some photos deserve a wider perspective …

Duddo Five Stones

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Steps Up To Radyr Station

These are the steps up to Platform 1 of Radyr Railway Station, as seen from the end of the bridge that crosses the River Taff to the immediate east to join with the Taff Trail.

Originally opened in 1863 as part of the Taff Vail Railway, Radyr Railway Station once sat at a busy railway junction and railway sidings (Radyr Yard). Today, the railway sidings are gone, and the station has been remodelled into three platforms serving trains travelling up from Cardiff Queen Street Railway Station via Cathays Railway Station on their way to Treherbert in the Rhondda, Aberdare in the Cynon Valley and Merthyr Tydfil in the Taff Valley (all via Pontypridd). The station is also the point where the railway south splits into two, with the City Line carrying passengers down via the longer Danescourt and Fairwater route into Cardiff Central.

The car park is popular on a weekend with cyclists looking for access to the Taff Trail; the section from here down to Cardiff Bay is very flat and very leisurely, and takes in beautiful areas such as Radyr Weir and Bute Park.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

This Way For Cycle Route Eight

The Taff Trail is a popular cycle and walking route that winds its way up from the barrage at Cardiff Bay, through the Garth Gap into the valleys, and north through Merthyr Tydfil and beyond to Brecon. It is the southern leg of the national cycle route 8, and whether you walk it or cycle it, much of its track up to Merthyr runs over older routes previously established by the Glamorganshire Canal, the Barry Railway, the Rhymney Railway, the Pontypridd, Caerphilly and Newport Railway, and the Penydarren Tramroad amongst others.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

Be the first to leave a comment »

St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

3 comments »

St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

2 comments »

Rugby Post In Hailey Park

Hailey Park in Llandaff North nestles between the eastern bank of the River Taff and what would have been the western bank of the Glamorganshire Canal as the canal emerged from beside the tin works at Melingriffith. Back when Radyr Yard still existed (which today is the site of a new housing estate immediately south west of Radyr Railway Station), a railway embankment ran through the northern end of the park’s grounds, crossing the River Taff over a now-disused bridge to join what today we call the City Line.

In 1923, a Mr C. P. Hailey wrote to Cardiff Corporation offering the land to be transformed into a public park. His offer was for the northern section of the park, and subsequently a Mr Emile Andrews agreed to provide the land to the south of Mr Hailey’s to form a single park. Work began in 1925, and the park was opened on 3rd May, 1926, forming a great open area that only became even more important when Cardiff Corporation closed the Glamorganshire Canal and built the Gabalfa housing estate.

Today, the park is home to Llandaff North Rugby Club, and the Taff Trail cycle route snakes its way up from the south west to the north east corner of the park. A local community group works closely with the city council to improve the park, but unfortunately they keep hitting setbacks as local yobs disrupt and vandalise the park. The railway embankment that ran across the park is gone, and the line of trees that run down the south east corner edge of the park is the last reminder to mark the route that the canal once took.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Rugby Post In Hailey Park

Hailey Park in Llandaff North nestles between the eastern bank of the River Taff and what would have been the western bank of the Glamorganshire Canal as the canal emerged from beside the tin works at Melingriffith. Back when Radyr Yard still existed (which today is the site of a new housing estate immediately south west of Radyr Railway Station), a railway embankment ran through the northern end of the park’s grounds, crossing the River Taff over a now-disused bridge to join what today we call the City Line.

In 1923, a Mr C. P. Hailey wrote to Cardiff Corporation offering the land to be transformed into a public park. His offer was for the northern section of the park, and subsequently a Mr Emile Andrews agreed to provide the land to the south of Mr Hailey’s to form a single park. Work began in 1925, and the park was opened on 3rd May, 1926, forming a great open area that only became even more important when Cardiff Corporation closed the Glamorganshire Canal and built the Gabalfa housing estate.

Today, the park is home to Llandaff North Rugby Club, and the Taff Trail cycle route snakes its way up from the south west to the north east corner of the park. A local community group works closely with the city council to improve the park, but unfortunately they keep hitting setbacks as local yobs disrupt and vandalise the park. The railway embankment that ran across the park is gone, and the line of trees that run down the south east corner edge of the park is the last reminder to mark the route that the canal once took.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

The Taff Trail Out Of Bute Park

At its northern end, Bute Park gets squeezed down to a narrow avenue of trees, standing guard over the Taff Trail cycle route. This park of the park is a bit far for the Cardiff lunch crown to manage; it’s a quiet place during the week, with only the occasional jogger and cyclist to break you out of your own contemplation.

To the immediate west runs the River Taff, and to the east runs the former route of the Glamorganshire Canal before it disappears underneath the retail park at Gabalfa.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

Be the first to leave a comment »

Grass In Bute Park

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

One of the great legacies from the age of coal that gave Cardiff its wealth before the First World War is also one of the great gifts made to the people of Cardiff. Originally flanked by Cardiff Castle to the south, the River Taff to the west, the Glamorganshire Canal to the east and Western Avenue to the north, Bute Park was begun in 1873 by the 3rd Marquess of Bute, and handed over to the people of Cardiff in 1947 by the 5th Marquess.

It is a fabulous place to roam, especially for the many thousands of office workers in Cardiff’s busy city centre who need somewhere to escape to on a lunch time. As well as open playing fields and the arboretum, there are quieter, shaded areas under the trees and by the river banks where you can go and hide with a book for a bit of peace and quiet.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

Be the first to leave a comment »
Page 1 of 512345

Latest Photos

Bridge Over The Falls
Avebury by Moonlight
Avebury by Moonlight
The North Face Of Corn Ddu
Corn Ddu and Llyn Cwm Llwch
Corn Ddu
Easter Cross
The North Route Up Pen-y-Fan
Cribyn
Remove Tape Before Firing

Categories

Archives

March 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031