Completed in 1926, Llwyn Onn is the southernmost and largest of the three reservoirs built across the Taf Fawr to supply water to Merthyr Tydfil and the valleys south to Cardiff. With unsually warm and dry weather so far in 2010, water levels at Llwyn Onn have dropped dramatically, revealing Pont-yr-Daf and allowing safe access along the retaining wall to the sluice gates at the southern end.

The Photos

Path Down From The Taff Trail

The Taff Trail (national cycle route 8 ) runs down the western edge of the reservoir, and from the road there are plenty of paths like this one that you can use to walk down to the shores of the reservoir.

Pont-yr-Daf Revealed By Drought

When the reservoir is at normal levels, Pont-yr-Daf lies underwater. But current water levels have fallen low enough to reveal the bridge – the only surviving structure from when the reservoir was created. This shot is looking north … note how the whole northern end of the reservoir is both silted up and completely dried out.

Pont yr Daf Revealed By Drought

Another shot of Pont-yr-Daf, showing the low water levels as we look south down the reservoir.

On reflection, I should have taken this photo at f/8, and made it sharp front-to-back. A lesson for future shots, I think.

Human Detritus In The Reservoir

Here’s a pile of human junk out in the middle of the drying Llwyn-Onn reservoir.

Note how green the ground is starting to turn at this spot. My wife reckons the ground here could have been exposed for about a month for these plants to take hold like this.

Looking South From Pont-yr-Daf

The Llwyn-Onn reservoir is completely dry north of Pont-yr-Daf. From the bridge itself, you can clearly see how the water is retreating south towards the reservoir’s retaining wall.

Reservoir Rubbish Up Close

This is a close-up shot of a tree that had been washed up in the reservoir at some point.

The Beach at Llwyn Onn

The water levels at the Llwyn Onn Reservoir north of Merthyr Tydfil have fallen quite low this year, exposing all of the northern end of the reservoir bed. It is drying and cracking up quite nicely.

Chasing The Receding Water

As the water level drops, the reservoir bed is being slowly uncovered. At first, the bed is a horrible sticky mud, and until it dries out it’s a bit tricky to walk on. The local fishermen have solved this problem, by creating stone pathways out to the water and extending them as the water level continues to drop.

Llwyn Onn Reservoir

Here’s a shot of the reservoir retaining wall, looking south along the reservoir towards Merthyr. You can clearly see how far the water stocks have fallen already this year, and summer is only just beginning.

The Tree Growing Out Of The Drainpipe

At the top of the retaining wall, my wife spotted this tree growing out of a drainpipe. It certainly looks like it has been here for some time.

The Sluice Gates At Llwyn Onn Reservoir

With the water levels so low, we were able to carefully walk out along the reservoir wall to the sluice gates.

The Bars Of The Sluice Gates

To stop debris being flushed into the sluice gates (and, presumably, to stop nosey photographers from doing something silly and ending up falling down the gates!) there are these metal bars across all of the sluice gates at the reservoir.

View this photo at ‘large’ or better on Flickr … the rust patterns in the bars are quite something.

Where Do The Gates Go?

Behind the bars lie the sluice gate itself … but what does it look like and where does it go?

Inside The Sluice Gates

This is what the bars are protecting … one of the sluice gates at the reservoir. Not far into the blackness there must be quite a drop down to the valley floor below. We didn’t go and explore the other side, so I couldn’t tell you whether the gates empty into the river below or into the water plant. Either way, it’s a ride that you don’t want to try.

Uncovered Shoe

Whilst clambering back along the reservoir wall after visiting the sluice gates, I spotted this shoe further down towards the receding water. I’m guessing it was washed up here when the water level fell, rather than being simply abandoned by someone else scrambling along the wall.

See Also

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Uncovered Shoe

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

To bring this week’s theme to a close, my desktop wallpaper today is this shoe I spotted on the reservoir wall as we clambered back from walking out to the sluice gates. The shoe was further down the wall than we were, and from the state of it it looks like it was washed up on the wall when the water levels fell.

I hope you’ve enjoyed my choices of wallpaper this week. Come back tomorrow for an extra blog post: all of the photos that I took during our visit to Llwyn Onn Reservoir on Sunday. And if you can’t wait until then, you’ll find them in my Flickr photostream.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Where Do The Gates Go?

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

My choice today is another photo I’d normally never have the opportunity to shoot. With the water level in the reservoir unusually low, we were able to walk out along the reservoir wall to the sluice gates. I’m the kind of person who sees something you’re normally not allowed or able to visit, and wonders where it goes, and what it looks like. This photo does absolutely nothing to answer those questions, but I like the mystery it projects too much 🙂

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Sluice Gates At Llwyn Onn Reservoir

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

My choice of desktop wallpaper today continues this week’s theme about low water levels in the local reservoir. The water levels were low enough that we felt safe walking out along the reservoir wall to go and take a very close look at the sluice gates themselves. You can see just how close we got from this somewhat abstract shot.

By deliberately placing the focus on the front of one of the metal bars, and using a very shallow depth of field, I’ve made the whole thing look like it’s just a bit out of reach, which makes it a great image to have sat behind my desktop icons for the day.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Beach at Llwyn Onn

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

My choice of desktop wallpaper today continues my theme about the water levels of one of the reservoirs in South Wales. As you can hopefully see from this shot, the northern end of the Llwyn Onn Reservoir has been completely exposed by the retreating waters, and is drying out and cracking up quite nicely.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Pont yr Daf Revealed By Drought

Download the full-size picture to use as your desktop wallpaper.

For this week’s theme, I had originally planned (and uploaded; they’re in my Flickr photo stream if you want a sneak peak) some macro shots taken around the house, but that will have to wait.

Thursday last week, I think it was, I saw a newspaper headline about impending drought and water shortages. That seemed odd, thought I, remembering how full the Welsh reservoirs had been earlier in the year, and thought nothing more of it. Then, on Saturday, I saw these photos on Flickr by trelewis of an old bridge normally hidden beneath the reservoir waters at Llwyn Onn.

So on Sunday afternoon, Kristi and I went up to see for ourselves. Given that it’s only mid-June, with the summer months still to come, the reservoir levels are very low indeed, and I changed my mind for this week’s theme and decided to share with you some of the shots I took, shots that normally simply aren’t possible. There’ll be more shots each day this week, and on Saturday I’ll publish the full set here on this blog.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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