The Tide Is In

I’ve been featuring the beautiful island of Lindisfarne for the last month now, and it seems only fitting that my last shot should be this one.

Once the tide is in, that’s it … the causeway is gone, and for roughly the next five hours the only way to get to and from Holy Island is by boat. All that’s left to show that there ever was a causeway are road signs like this one, poking out of the clear blue waters of the bay.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series of photos; I think I got very lucky with the light on the day I took them. I can’t recommend the Northumberland coastline strongly enough as a place to go with your camera. It isn’t just beautiful, it’s also so quiet … that 120 mile stretch between Newcastle and Edinburgh is almost entirely rural, with only small villages and harbours for the most part.

I haven’t decided what next week’s theme will be … it’s currently a toss-up between last Saturday’s photoshoot in Ledbury, featuring some of the Manchester shots I took at Christmas, or making a start on my photos of Edinburgh. If you have a preference, do let me know!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Causeway Floods

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

Quite a crowd gathered on the causeway to watch the tide claim it, and to play in the rising water. This boy stood at the water’s edge, clutching his trainers to keep them dry, watching his family paddling away on the fast-disappearing road.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Flying Away With The Food

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

Moments before, an ice cream van pulled up and left some food for the gulls to fight over, after the swan had been hand-fed:

Feeding The Swan

After a brief tussle, one gull managed to make off with the food, with the others in hot pursuit. Along with my shot of the Sea King helicopter in flight, I think it’s one of the best manual-focus shots I took on the whole holiday.

Search and Rescue Helicopter

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Causeway From The Refuge

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

The drivers’ refuge on the causeway is very small, but it does afford a lovely view along the length of the causeway to Holy Island. The walkers you can see are just about to leave the road and trudge through the muddy bay floor to follow the line of marker poles that mark out the alternative route across the bay.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Refuge On The Causeway

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

When the tide comes in to cover the causeway, there’s always the risk of someone getting trapped mid-crossing … and you only need to go and watch from a safe distance to see just how many drivers are perfectly happy to risk a crossing even as the waters start to close in, as can be seen in this 2008 photo by Ian Britton:

Holy Island Causeway

I wonder how many people, over the years, have taken shelter up at the top of the steps of the refuge and watched as their car was engulfed by the tide?

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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Driving Onto Lindisfarne

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

If you’re coming to Holy Island to make the most of its produce, then you’ll want to drive. That way, you don’t end up with too much to carry, and you’ll have no trouble at all getting off of the island before the causeway becomes unpassable when the tide comes in.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Walking Onto Lindisfarne

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

Not everyone drives onto Holy Island. You’ll find people of all ages walking along the causeway. Once they’ve bought some of the island’s famous produce, I imagine they find the walk back just a little longer 🙂

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Lindisfarne Causeway

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

Here is the causeway itself, looking west from Holy Island back to the mainland. I was struck by the texture of the road itself, and how the light reflected off the water that still sat in the little pits of the tarmac.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Dry Land - For Now

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

This is pretty much the spot where the causeway touches down on dry land. However, I wouldn’t want to be standing here when the tide comes in, as you’ll probably get very wet feet very quickly!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Sandbags Beside The Causeway

My theme this week is the tiny island of Lindisfarne, famous for being a place of holy retreat and for the mead and other drinks that it produces. Lindisfarne is connected to the mainland by a causeway that is only accessible when the tide goes out, and I made the area of the island around the causeway my focus for the day.

I spotted these sandbags a little bit inland from the causeway, where they were vainly trying to hold back water flooding over the road. In general, most motorists slowed down at this point, but there were several who did the exact opposite, and really went for it to see how large a splash they could achieve. Just something to note if you ever walk onto the island yourself!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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