Radial Engine?

For this week’s theme, I’m returning to Scotland’s National Museum of Flight. It is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Hangar 3 is a photographer’s paradise, as it is home to a large variety of aircraft currently undergoing restoration. That means that you can shoot bits of aircraft that you can’t normally see. What’s more, Mrs H and I had the place to ourselves, allowing us to take our time and really explore with our cameras.

One of my favourite shots from Hangar 3 is this engine. I think this is what they call a radial engine … it certainly makes me think of those big American World War II fighters like the P47 Thunderbolt. There’s something really substantial about the look of this engine; it looks big and powerful and take-no-prisoners.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Oxygen Pull

For this week’s theme, I’m returning to Scotland’s National Museum of Flight. It is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Not all the attractions are in the hangars. Between Hanger 4 (home of Concorde) and Hangar 3 (home of aircraft awaiting restoration) sits a BAC1-11. This example first flew in 1968, and served British Airways until its retirement in 1993. You can go onboard and see both the well-preserved seating and the cockpit.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Rudder And Trim

For this week’s theme, I’m returning to Scotland’s National Museum of Flight. It is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Not all the attractions are in the hangars. Between Hanger 4 (home of Concorde) and Hangar 3 (home of aircraft awaiting restoration) sits a BAC1-11. This example first flew in 1968, and served British Airways until its retirement in 1993. You can go onboard and see both the well-preserved seating and the cockpit.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Seating On The BAC1-11

For this week’s theme, I’m returning to Scotland’s National Museum of Flight. It is home to a wonderful collection of aircraft, both military and civilian. The star attraction of the museum is undoubtably Concorde G-BOAA, but there’s plenty of other aircraft to see and enjoy too, and we certainly didn’t get around all four hangars plus all of the outside exhibits in a single day.

Not all the attractions are in the hangars. Between Hanger 4 (home of Concorde) and Hangar 3 (home of aircraft awaiting restoration) sits a BAC1-11. This example first flew in 1968, and served British Airways until its retirement in 1993. You can go onboard and see both the well-preserved seating and the cockpit.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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During our September 2010 holiday up in the beautiful county of Northumberland, we got to spend a day on Lindisfarne, or Holy Island as it is also known as. It’s one of the few islands around the UK connected by a road causeway that you can drive across at low tide, plus you can also walk across the bay itself by following a trail of marker poles. That’s where I focused my time, and these are the better photos that I took on the day.

I hope you enjoy them.

Stone Cubes Beside The Road

Fence Beside The Road

No Unauthorised Vehicles Beyond This Point

Former Windmill?

Photographer In The Field

Refuge In The Bay

Footprints In The Mud

Marker Pole

Refuge Against The Sky

Looking Back

Sandbags Beside The Causeway

Dry Land - For Now

Driving Onto Lindisfarne

The Lindisfarne Causeway

Walking Onto Lindisfarne

Refuge On The Causeway

Causeway From The Refuge

Flying Away With The Food

The Causeway Floods

The Tide Is In

Some of the photos also work really well imho in my experimental 25×9 format:

Buildings On Lindisfarne

Crossing To Holy Island

Footprints In The Mud

Crossing To Holy Island

The Bay Floor

Crossing To Holy Island

Feeding The Swan

Fleeing With The Food

Goodbye Causeway

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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Pretty Tree In The Brecon Beacons

Earlier this year, Mrs H and I grabbed the cameras one evening after work and headed up into the heart of the Brecon Beacons to the National Visitors’ Centre, which enjoys stunning views over to Pen-y-Fan to the east. We had about an hour to make the most of the evening light.

The light didn’t last long, and neither did my knee … we were soon heading back to the car park, but couldn’t resist one last attempt to catch this pretty tree, standing as it was all alone in the fading light.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s theme as much as we enjoyed the evening walk where we took these shots. Have a great weekend, and I’ll be back on Monday with more photos from the National Museum of Flight in Scotland.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Handsome Fence Posts In The Brecon Beacons

Earlier this year, Mrs H and I grabbed the cameras one evening after work and headed up into the heart of the Brecon Beacons to the National Visitors’ Centre, which enjoys stunning views over to Pen-y-Fan to the east. We had about an hour to make the most of the evening light.

And what light it was! The trick was finding the right angle, and in this shot I think I found it.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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The Tree Denied

Earlier this year, Mrs H and I grabbed the cameras one evening after work and headed up into the heart of the Brecon Beacons to the National Visitors’ Centre, which enjoys stunning views over to Pen-y-Fan to the east. We had about an hour to make the most of the evening light.

The Visitors’ Centre is set at the edge of Mynydd Illtyd, a gentle rolling moorland common that offers great views over the A470 to Pen-y-Fan to the east. If you are a lover of wide open spaces, it’s a great place to go for an easy amble to relax from the rat race. Scattered around the moorland is the odd tree line, normally fenced off from walkers, making a lovely contrast for visitors.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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Wire Fence In The Brecon Beacons

Earlier this year, Mrs H and I grabbed the cameras one evening after work and headed up into the heart of the Brecon Beacons to the National Visitors’ Centre, which enjoys stunning views over to Pen-y-Fan to the east. We had about an hour to make the most of the evening light.

One of the lovely things about the Beacons in general, and the National Visitors’ Centre in particular, is the amount of open land up here for the sensible walker to roam and explore. In return, please make sure that fences and walls are properly respected.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Wire Fence In The Brecon Beacons

Earlier this year, Mrs H and I grabbed the cameras one evening after work and headed up into the heart of the Brecon Beacons to the National Visitors’ Centre, which enjoys stunning views over to Pen-y-Fan to the east. We had about an hour to make the most of the evening light.

One of the lovely things about the Beacons in general, and the National Visitors’ Centre in particular, is the amount of open land up here for the sensible walker to roam and explore. In return, please make sure that fences and walls are properly respected.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

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