Pontypridd Signal Box

The disused railway signal box at Pontypridd is a Grade II listed building, and was once part of Pontypridd Junction. It played a part in the Hopkinstown Railway Disaster of 1911 (see also Wikipedia), when a stationary northbound coal train failed to comply with Rule 55 and ended up in collision with a southbound passenger train. Eleven people lost their lives.

Today, the signal box stands abandoned, unused. I’ve been unable to find any online reference for when the signal box closed. If you know, please leave a comment below.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

2 comments »

Merry Christmas, everyone. I hope you’re all wrapped up nice and warm!

Last week, the #uksnow finally arrived in South Wales, turning everything into a winter wonderland right on our doorstep. With the car buried in snow, Mrs H and I headed out on foot with the cameras. I’ve been sharing these shots via my Desktop Wallpaper project all week; here’s a round-up of all of the photos that I’ve published on Flickr for the snow.

Poor Driving Conditions

Snow-Covered Cables

The A470 Under Snow

Taff Trail Sign In The Snow

Disappearing Off Into The Snow

Merthyr Road In Mist

Sunlight On The Snow

School's Out For Snow

Snow-Covered Cables

Zebra Crossing With A Snow Hat

Rusting Pole In The Snow

Bus Stop In The Snow

Quarry In The Snow

Cottages Through The Trees

Trecherous Side Road

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Merthyr Road In Mist

It’s Christmas Eve, which means that this week’s theme of a snow-covered Merthyr Road is drawing to a close. So, to finish off the week, here’s how the end of my street looked on Saturday morning after the unseasonable snow Friday afternoon and evening.

40 years ago, before the A470 trunk road was completed, this was the main road between Cardiff, Merthyr and Brecon, but thanks to the snow and mist, this week it was reduced to picture-postcard status. Plenty of 4×4’s and vans still struggled up and down it, with the odd car too, but snow ploughs? Didn’t see one all morning whilst we were out with the cameras, sadly.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s seasonable and unusually (for me!) topical theme. Have yourself a safe and Merry Christmas.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Snow-Covered Cables

This week’s wallpaper theme is the unseasonable snow that arrived at the weekend, as we countdown to Christmas Day on Saturday.

Everywhere we looked was a photograph just waiting to be taken, and that included looking upwards. It’s fair to say that much of South Wales infrastructure remains firmly in the 20th century, and there are fewer things that hark back to the fading end of the industrial period more than the mass of telegraph poles carrying overhead cables into our stone terraced houses. If you’re out and about trying to capture photos, remember to look up!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Cottages Through The Trees

Between Pontypridd and Abercynon, the floor of the valley is mostly farmland, punctuated by this row of currently snow-blanketed cottages. They look very postcard-like in this shot. They also look like they need some extra loft insulation adding too!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Poor Driving Conditions

One of the reasons we chose to move to Pontypridd was that it’s got excellent road and rail links, including the impressive A470 trunk road. But on Saturday, the recent and unseasonable winter weather turned both the A470 and its predecessor (renumbered the A4054) into snow-bound car parks for the morning.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

4 comments »

Taff Trail Sign In The Snow

My plan for this week was to start my ‘2010 In Photography’ review … but the turn in the weather at the weekend was simply too good a photography opportunity to pass up. So, as we countdown to Christmas Day on Saturday, my wallpaper choices this week are all based around South Wales in the unseasonable winter snow.

The UK has been suffering from the snow for a bit now, but mostly we’ve managed to avoid it down here in and around Cardiff. All that changed on Friday, as the snow gods finally remembered about us and decided to pay us a visit! Mrs H and I woke up on Saturday morning to a scene we haven’t seen since I moved over here ten years ago now, and headed out on foot with the cameras to capture the conditions. We’re very lucky where we live, as the Taff Trail runs very close to our front door. Oddly enough, there weren’t any cyclists out on Saturday morning though 😉

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

The community centre at Trallwn in Pontypridd is typical of many in the valleys. Originally a mission hall, it has been extended and converted into a great resource for the local community. The result is an exterior that at first glance appears old, like the terraced houses around it appear old, but look closer, and the mixture of old and new make for an interesting subject for my camera.

The Photos

Gate To The Community Centre

Plants Growing Out Of The Wall

Fence And Yellow

Fastening The Litter Bin To The Telegraph Pole

Extractor Fan Grill

Down The Drain

Drain Pipe On The Wall

Drain Pipe, Leaves and Vent

Grit Salt

Bethania, 1908

The Old Entrance To The Hall

Be the first to leave a comment »

St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

2 comments »

St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

3 comments »
Page 1 of 512345

Latest Photos

Superman
Wonder Woman
Batman
The Joker
The Flash
Green Lantern
Batman
The Penguin
Aquaman
Cyborg

Categories

Archives

April 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30