Day Return

An old weathered sticker stuck behind a bus timetable where no-one is ever going to see it.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

2 comments »

3

A number stuck to a lamp post in Gwaelod-y-Garth. Taken back in August, during an evening out to get to grips with my new 80-200mm f/2.8 lens.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

1 comment »

Bus Stop For 26B To Cardiff (Central Stn)

Bus stop sign seen at Gwaelod-y-Garth, whilst out getting to grips with my new 80-200mm f/28 lens.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Notices! Hot News!

Taken back in August 2010, getting to grips with my new 80-200 f/2.8 lens.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

1 comment »

Steps Up To Radyr Station

These are the steps up to Platform 1 of Radyr Railway Station, as seen from the end of the bridge that crosses the River Taff to the immediate east to join with the Taff Trail.

Originally opened in 1863 as part of the Taff Vail Railway, Radyr Railway Station once sat at a busy railway junction and railway sidings (Radyr Yard). Today, the railway sidings are gone, and the station has been remodelled into three platforms serving trains travelling up from Cardiff Queen Street Railway Station via Cathays Railway Station on their way to Treherbert in the Rhondda, Aberdare in the Cynon Valley and Merthyr Tydfil in the Taff Valley (all via Pontypridd). The station is also the point where the railway south splits into two, with the City Line carrying passengers down via the longer Danescourt and Fairwater route into Cardiff Central.

The car park is popular on a weekend with cyclists looking for access to the Taff Trail; the section from here down to Cardiff Bay is very flat and very leisurely, and takes in beautiful areas such as Radyr Weir and Bute Park.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

This Way For Cycle Route Eight

The Taff Trail is a popular cycle and walking route that winds its way up from the barrage at Cardiff Bay, through the Garth Gap into the valleys, and north through Merthyr Tydfil and beyond to Brecon. It is the southern leg of the national cycle route 8, and whether you walk it or cycle it, much of its track up to Merthyr runs over older routes previously established by the Glamorganshire Canal, the Barry Railway, the Rhymney Railway, the Pontypridd, Caerphilly and Newport Railway, and the Penydarren Tramroad amongst others.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

Be the first to leave a comment »

Now a convenient shortcut for anyone using the Treforest Industrial Estate Railway Station on the old Taff Vale Railway line (modern-day Valley Lines service), this bridge used to carry a railway siding south from the Upper Boat Power Station into factories on the industrial estate.

I used to think that this was a surviving relic of the old Cardiff Railway, but sadly that just isn’t true; Cardiff Railway remained on the eastern bank of the River Taff (with a station where the Focus DIY store now is at Upper Boat) before finally crossing the Taff over the impressive (but sadly doomed) Rhydefelin Viaduct.

Even so, this bridge is one of the most impressive survivors in the area, and it definitely deserves a feature all of its own.

The Photos

The View Most People See

This is how most people see the bridge, as an essential short-cut across the Taff to and from the nearby railway station.

Admiring The Structure Of The Bridge

If you do find yourself crossing this bridge, I urge you to stop for a few moments to admire it. It is one of the few surviving structures from its time. The railway siding that it carried, and the power station and factories that used to sit at either end of this siding are long gone.

It Needs A Lick Of Paint

As this close-up of the bridge’s structure shows, it could do with a lick of paint to preserve it from the elements for a bit longer.

Wooden Flooring Along The Bridge

The old trackbed is long gone, replaced by this wooden boarding. Be careful in wet and icy weather; I’ve slipped and slided my way from one end of the bridge to the other on more than one occasion!

The Bridge From Upstream

Taken from upstream, looking south west along the River Taff to the bridge. Doesn’t it just look fine? I don’t think you’ll find another one like it anywhere else along the length of the Taff.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

3 comments »

Rugby Post In Hailey Park

Hailey Park in Llandaff North nestles between the eastern bank of the River Taff and what would have been the western bank of the Glamorganshire Canal as the canal emerged from beside the tin works at Melingriffith. Back when Radyr Yard still existed (which today is the site of a new housing estate immediately south west of Radyr Railway Station), a railway embankment ran through the northern end of the park’s grounds, crossing the River Taff over a now-disused bridge to join what today we call the City Line.

In 1923, a Mr C. P. Hailey wrote to Cardiff Corporation offering the land to be transformed into a public park. His offer was for the northern section of the park, and subsequently a Mr Emile Andrews agreed to provide the land to the south of Mr Hailey’s to form a single park. Work began in 1925, and the park was opened on 3rd May, 1926, forming a great open area that only became even more important when Cardiff Corporation closed the Glamorganshire Canal and built the Gabalfa housing estate.

Today, the park is home to Llandaff North Rugby Club, and the Taff Trail cycle route snakes its way up from the south west to the north east corner of the park. A local community group works closely with the city council to improve the park, but unfortunately they keep hitting setbacks as local yobs disrupt and vandalise the park. The railway embankment that ran across the park is gone, and the line of trees that run down the south east corner edge of the park is the last reminder to mark the route that the canal once took.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

Rugby Post In Hailey Park

Hailey Park in Llandaff North nestles between the eastern bank of the River Taff and what would have been the western bank of the Glamorganshire Canal as the canal emerged from beside the tin works at Melingriffith. Back when Radyr Yard still existed (which today is the site of a new housing estate immediately south west of Radyr Railway Station), a railway embankment ran through the northern end of the park’s grounds, crossing the River Taff over a now-disused bridge to join what today we call the City Line.

In 1923, a Mr C. P. Hailey wrote to Cardiff Corporation offering the land to be transformed into a public park. His offer was for the northern section of the park, and subsequently a Mr Emile Andrews agreed to provide the land to the south of Mr Hailey’s to form a single park. Work began in 1925, and the park was opened on 3rd May, 1926, forming a great open area that only became even more important when Cardiff Corporation closed the Glamorganshire Canal and built the Gabalfa housing estate.

Today, the park is home to Llandaff North Rugby Club, and the Taff Trail cycle route snakes its way up from the south west to the north east corner of the park. A local community group works closely with the city council to improve the park, but unfortunately they keep hitting setbacks as local yobs disrupt and vandalise the park. The railway embankment that ran across the park is gone, and the line of trees that run down the south east corner edge of the park is the last reminder to mark the route that the canal once took.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

Be the first to leave a comment »

The Taff Trail Out Of Bute Park

At its northern end, Bute Park gets squeezed down to a narrow avenue of trees, standing guard over the Taff Trail cycle route. This park of the park is a bit far for the Cardiff lunch crown to manage; it’s a quiet place during the week, with only the occasional jogger and cyclist to break you out of your own contemplation.

To the immediate west runs the River Taff, and to the east runs the former route of the Glamorganshire Canal before it disappears underneath the retail park at Gabalfa.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

Be the first to leave a comment »
Page 1 of 41234

Latest Photos

Superman
Wonder Woman
Batman
The Joker
The Flash
Green Lantern
Batman
The Penguin
Aquaman
Cyborg

Categories

Archives

July 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031