During our September 2010 holiday up in the beautiful county of Northumberland, we got to spend a day on Lindisfarne, or Holy Island as it is also known as. It’s one of the few islands around the UK connected by a road causeway that you can drive across at low tide, plus you can also walk across the bay itself by following a trail of marker poles. That’s where I focused my time, and these are the better photos that I took on the day.

I hope you enjoy them.

Stone Cubes Beside The Road

Fence Beside The Road

No Unauthorised Vehicles Beyond This Point

Former Windmill?

Photographer In The Field

Refuge In The Bay

Footprints In The Mud

Marker Pole

Refuge Against The Sky

Looking Back

Sandbags Beside The Causeway

Dry Land - For Now

Driving Onto Lindisfarne

The Lindisfarne Causeway

Walking Onto Lindisfarne

Refuge On The Causeway

Causeway From The Refuge

Flying Away With The Food

The Causeway Floods

The Tide Is In

Some of the photos also work really well imho in my experimental 25×9 format:

Buildings On Lindisfarne

Crossing To Holy Island

Footprints In The Mud

Crossing To Holy Island

The Bay Floor

Crossing To Holy Island

Feeding The Swan

Fleeing With The Food

Goodbye Causeway

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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(Apologies if you’ve already seen these photos over on my PHP blog, but I also wanted to share them with the folks who read my photography blog).

Another year, another great PHP North West conference organised by Jeremy Coates and his team at Magma Digital and the PHP North West User Group.

This year, I went along with my camera to try my hand at conference photography for the first time, in between attending plenty of great talks.

Friday Social

These are the best of my shots from the pre-conference socials on the Friday night before the conference.

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

Jeremy Coates

These are my best shots of Jeremy Coates, who led the organising effort for the conference.

Jeremy Coates

Jeremy Coates

Jeremy Coates

Saturday Speakers: Track 1

These are my best shots of the speakers from Track 1 (there were three tracks in total) in the main auditorium.

Lorna Mitchell

Rob Allen

Rob Allen

Ian Barber

Ian Barber

Marco Tabini

Harrie Verveer

Derick Rethans & Rob Allen

Marcus Deglos

Marcus Deglos & David Zuelke

David Zuelke

Conference Audience

These are my best shots of the audience from Track 1 (there were three tracks in total) in the main auditorium.

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

I hope you’ve enjoyed them. I’ve also posted my thoughts on being a first-time conference photographer earlier in the week.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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(Apologies if you’ve already seen these photos over on my PHP blog, but I also wanted to share them with the folks who read my photography blog).

Another year, another great PHP North West conference organised by Jeremy Coates and his team at Magma Digital and the PHP North West User Group.

This year, I went along with my camera to try my hand at conference photography for the first time, in between attending plenty of great talks.

Friday Social

These are the best of my shots from the pre-conference socials on the Friday night before the conference.

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

PHPNW10 Friday Social

Jeremy Coates

These are my best shots of Jeremy Coates, who led the organising effort for the conference.

Jeremy Coates

Jeremy Coates

Jeremy Coates

Saturday Speakers: Track 1

These are my best shots of the speakers from Track 1 (there were three tracks in total) in the main auditorium.

Lorna Mitchell

Rob Allen

Rob Allen

Ian Barber

Ian Barber

Marco Tabini

Harrie Verveer

Derick Rethans & Rob Allen

Marcus Deglos

Marcus Deglos & David Zuelke

David Zuelke

Conference Audience

These are my best shots of the audience from Track 1 (there were three tracks in total) in the main auditorium.

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

Conference Audience

I hope you’ve enjoyed them. I’ve also posted my thoughts on being a first-time conference photographer earlier in the week.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. Blog | Twitter | Facebook
Photography: Merthyr Road | Daily Desktop Wallpaper | 25×9 | Twitter.

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The community centre at Trallwn in Pontypridd is typical of many in the valleys. Originally a mission hall, it has been extended and converted into a great resource for the local community. The result is an exterior that at first glance appears old, like the terraced houses around it appear old, but look closer, and the mixture of old and new make for an interesting subject for my camera.

The Photos

Gate To The Community Centre

Plants Growing Out Of The Wall

Fence And Yellow

Fastening The Litter Bin To The Telegraph Pole

Extractor Fan Grill

Down The Drain

Drain Pipe On The Wall

Drain Pipe, Leaves and Vent

Grit Salt

Bethania, 1908

The Old Entrance To The Hall

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Roadworks Have Become A Permanent Fixture

The redevelopment and regeneration of Cardiff, which started with the construction of Cardiff Bay in the late 1990’s, is in full-swing, with no sign of any sort of let-up. Roadworks and the knock-on travel disruption have become such a daily part of life in our capital city that at least one roadwork sign has gone from a temporary thing to looking like a permanent fixture!

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

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St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

2 comments »

St Matthews Church was built in 1908 in the middle of the Trallwn community, not far from the Glamorganshire Canal as it approached Pontypridd. Featuring unusual terracotta arches, this large and now disused church is unmissable as you travel down the hill to the local shops.

The church is now closed, and up for sale. The local council has given planning permission to convert the site to residential use; presumably the church will be demolished rather than adapted when this finally takes place. At the time of writing, it wasn’t clear whether anyone has yet bought this site.

The Photos

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

You can’t travel far in the valleys without running into a (usually former) church or mission hall, but to date I haven’t seen any other church with these distinctive terracotta arches.

St Matthews Church, Pontypridd

The church is quite sizeable, much larger than the much more common mission halls (there are two such halls in the same street alone!) Sadly, vandals appear to taken to throwing stones at the (what appear to be) plain glass windows. I wonder if this is why they’ve been leaving the local greenhouses alone for a little while now?

Ivy On The Walls

There’s no shortage of ivy clinging to the church’s walls.

Terracotta Feature By The Doors

The church’s distinctive terracotta features can be seen up close by the church’s main doorway.

Knocker and Key Hole, St Matthews Church

The main doorway uses two doors of a simple wooden design, with an iron knocker and key hole on the left-hand door.

Wooden Doors, St Matthews Church

Look up at the top of the doors, this shot shows the shadow cast by the archway. I like the simple pattern towards the top, which makes me think of a tree.

Stone Wall and Ivy, St Matthews Church

The walls of the church (like all of the original local housing) are stone rather than brick. There are several former quarry sites in the area; it’s likely that the stone didn’t have far to travel.

Ivy and Fence Post, St Matthews Church

Some of the walls have disappeared underneath the ivy growth, with features such as this drain pipe doing their best to stand out until they too become overgrown.

Under The Eaves, St Matthews Church

This unusual shot, looking up at the guttering, shows wooden beams (presumably from the roof) sticking out from beneath the ivy. The paint on the wood has largely flaked off. I hope the wood is well-treated!

Blackberries Outside St Matthews Church

There are wild berries sticking out of the otherwise overgrown grounds. I’m sure they didn’t stay there for very long, before someone came along and picked them.

Rusted Wire And Plastic On The Fence

This rusting lurid green fence runs around the (small) grounds of the church. My eye was drawn to the contrast of this rusting wire and probably-never-will-degrade plastic wrapped around the fence. I’m guessing that both have been used at some point to fasten notices of some kind to the fence.

The Fence Is Broken

Sadly, the fence is in a poor state of repair, and has broken (or been broken) at one point, causing it to lean back away from the road and pavement.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

3 comments »

Now a convenient shortcut for anyone using the Treforest Industrial Estate Railway Station on the old Taff Vale Railway line (modern-day Valley Lines service), this bridge used to carry a railway siding south from the Upper Boat Power Station into factories on the industrial estate.

I used to think that this was a surviving relic of the old Cardiff Railway, but sadly that just isn’t true; Cardiff Railway remained on the eastern bank of the River Taff (with a station where the Focus DIY store now is at Upper Boat) before finally crossing the Taff over the impressive (but sadly doomed) Rhydefelin Viaduct.

Even so, this bridge is one of the most impressive survivors in the area, and it definitely deserves a feature all of its own.

The Photos

The View Most People See

This is how most people see the bridge, as an essential short-cut across the Taff to and from the nearby railway station.

Admiring The Structure Of The Bridge

If you do find yourself crossing this bridge, I urge you to stop for a few moments to admire it. It is one of the few surviving structures from its time. The railway siding that it carried, and the power station and factories that used to sit at either end of this siding are long gone.

It Needs A Lick Of Paint

As this close-up of the bridge’s structure shows, it could do with a lick of paint to preserve it from the elements for a bit longer.

Wooden Flooring Along The Bridge

The old trackbed is long gone, replaced by this wooden boarding. Be careful in wet and icy weather; I’ve slipped and slided my way from one end of the bridge to the other on more than one occasion!

The Bridge From Upstream

Taken from upstream, looking south west along the River Taff to the bridge. Doesn’t it just look fine? I don’t think you’ll find another one like it anywhere else along the length of the Taff.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

If you’re reading this in the RSS feed, my original blog post also includes a Google map showing where this photo was taken. Unfortunately I haven’t managed to get the map to appear yet in the RSS feed, so for now you’ll have to click through to my blog if you want to see the map. Sorry.

3 comments »

Cardiff Central Station From The East

One of the best angles to view Cardiff Central Railway Station is from the east, looking along its open concourse to the main terminal building which houses the ticket office and assorted shops.

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

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Port Authority Building, Cardiff Bay

Look at any old photo of Cardiff’s docks in their heyday, and there are two constants to be seen. One is the railway station at the southern end of the Taff Vale Railway (TVR), which today is the Cardiff Bay railway station. The other is the Pierhead Building, former home to the Bute Dock Company (later renamed to the Cardiff Railway Company), and it provides a fantastic point of reference to help us see how the land around it has been utterly transformed since the height of the docks.

Built in 1897, the Pierhead Building was commissioned to be the new headquarters of the Bute Dock Company. Today, it is part of the estate of the Welsh Assembly, and serves a dual-purpose role of public museum and events venue.

I haven’t visited the museum since it opened in March, 2010 yet, but I will do so shortly. It’s my growing hypothesis that Cardiff-based exhibitions tend to downplay the debt that the city owes to the exploitation of the natural resources of the valleys (which have been left economically devastated in the post-industrial world), and I’m very curious to see what this exhibition says on the matter.

References

Copyright (c) Stuart Herbert. blog | twitter: (photography) (all) | facebook: (Merthyr Road project) (all).

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