Stuart is running a course in Manchester in October immediately before the PHPNW09 conference on how to setup and organise your PHP developers to ensure things run smoothly for you and your customers, which will include looking at how to get the most out of Trac. Learn more about the course, or sign-up now.

When it’s just you, working on one project at a time, it’s easy enough to keep track of the work you’re doing and the work you still need to do to complete the job. Chances are you can keep it all in your head, or at least keep the discussions with your customer on something like Basecamp in your head. You know that you should be using source control and bug tracking because it is “best practice”, but it just seems like too much of an overhead to bother with when it’s just you. After all, you’re working on the customer’s server, and there’s no-one else editing the code anyway.

Some of the folks reading this blog post might be cringing at that, but I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve come across professional PHP developers who work in exactly this way. Is it because they don’t know better? Maybe. Is it because it has worked okay for them up to now? For sure.

But eventually, there comes a point where one developer becomes a team of two … or more. Having a team means that you can go after larger projects … but it also means that you have to go after larger projects to pay the team. Larger projects mean more complicated requirements, multiple phased deliveries … and a larger, more demanding (and probably a more complicated) customer holding the pay cheque.

Running a team of PHP developers (like all management activity in all walks of life) comes down to three key things: direction, organisation, and supervision. Only now it isn’t just you and a customer, just a list that you can keep in your head. Now you need to keep track of a larger list, of multiple lists for multiple people to work on that need to be brought together in the end, and if anything slips through the cracks it’s your reputation on the line. Getting the customer to come back for repeat business just got a lot less easy to take for granted.

Trac and Subversion have been part of our community’s toolkit for many years now. Used correctly, you can get yourself and your customers well-organised, and grow your reputation when you grow your team. If you haven’t started using them yet, both are open-source, and well-backed with plenty of information freely available around the blogosphere on how to use them.

Or join me in Manchester in early October, where I’ll show you how they fit into an overall approach to running your team of PHP developers.

No Comments

  1. Herman Radtke says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 3:32 pm

    I love Trac. My only complaint is that it lacks support for multiple projects. Setting up a new Trac installation for every project is such a chore that I have been looking for alternatives to Trac that provide support for multiple projects.

  2. Stuart Herbert says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 7:23 pm

    @herman: We use it at work for multiple projects, and are very happy with it. We just knocked up a short shell script to create both the trac instance and the corresponding subversion repository at the same time.

  3. Herman Radtke says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 3:32 pm

    I love Trac. My only complaint is that it lacks support for multiple projects. Setting up a new Trac installation for every project is such a chore that I have been looking for alternatives to Trac that provide support for multiple projects.

  4. Stuart Herbert says:
    September 15th, 2009 at 7:23 pm

    @herman: We use it at work for multiple projects, and are very happy with it. We just knocked up a short shell script to create both the trac instance and the corresponding subversion repository at the same time.

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