In my Beyond Frameworks talk, I explained how a component-based architecture can help answer some of the important (i.e. expensive!) questions you might face when creating long-lived apps that rely on a PHP framework. In this series of blog posts, I’m going to look at how to go about creating and working with components.

We’ve created a development tool, called phix, to make it as easy as possible to create and maintain your own components written in PHP. Phix is normally installed onto a development desktop or laptop; you would normally only need to install Phix on a server running CentOS if the server is a shared development server or a continuous integration server running something like Jenkins.

Follow these easy instructions to get phix installed on CentOS.

Using The One-Line Installer

The easiest way to get phix installed onto your CentOS server is to run the following command from a Terminal window:

curl -O http://phix-project.org/installers/centos-6.sh ; su -c 'bash centos-6.sh'

This command downloads a simple shell script (which you can find on GitHub if you want to read it before trying it!), which is then run as the user “root”. The shell script:

  • Makes sure that you have a suitable version of PHP installed
  • Uses apt-get to install required dependencies
  • Uses the pecl command to install PHP extensions that we can’t get packaged for CentOS
  • Upgrades the PEAR installer to the latest version
  • Installs the package phix/phix4componentdev, plus dependencies, from the PEAR channel pear.phix-project.org

If all goes well, once everything has finished, run the following command and you’ll see that phix is now installed:

$ pear list -c phix | grep phix
phix                       0.13.2  stable
phix4componentdev          0.13.2  stable

Where To Find The Latest Installation Instructions

You can always find the latest installation instructions for phix on the Phix project’s website, including full instructions on how to do a manual install if you have trouble with our one-line installer.

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We Need An Oktober(blog)Fest!

Posted by Stuart Herbert on October 3rd, 2011 in Community.

After Chris Shiflett‘s Ideas of March call earlier in the year, we had a fantastic period where the conversation moved from Twitter back to longer pieces on blogs.

Sadly, that has faded out once more. We need another blog revival.

To (slightly) paraphrase Chris’s original call, it’s very easy to take part in Oktober(blog)Fest:

  • Write a post called Oktober(blog)Fest.
  • List some of the reasons you like blogs.
  • Pledge to blog more the rest of the month.
  • Share your thoughts on Twitter with the #oktoberblogfest hashtag.
  • If we all blog a little more than we normally would this month, maybe we can be reminded of all of the reasons blogs are great.

Over in Germany, it’s currently the OktoberFest, where much beer gets consumed. And it just happens that October is also one of the important months in the PHP conference calendar … where much beer gets consumed 🙂

  • There are two of the larger PHP conferences this month – PHP NorthWest 2011 and ZendCon.
  • If you go to either of these conferences, please blog about your experiences of the conferences, the topics you see and hear, and especially the fantastic ideas you come away with that you’re dying to try for yourself
  • Share the link to your conference blog post on Twitter with the #oktoberblogfest hashtag, so that we can all find and read your blog post.

It should be a great month of reading 🙂

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In my Beyond Frameworks talk, I explained how a component-based architecture can help answer some of the important (i.e. expensive!) questions you might face when creating long-lived apps that rely on a PHP framework. In this series of blog posts, I’m going to look at how to go about creating and working with components.

We’ve created a development tool, called phix, to make it as easy as possible to create and maintain your own components written in PHP. Phix is normally installed onto a development desktop or laptop; you would normally only need to install Phix on a server running Debian if the server is a shared development server or a continuous integration server running something like Jenkins.

Follow these easy instructions to get phix installed on Debian.

Using The One-Line Installer

The easiest way to get phix installed onto your Debian server is to run the following command from a Terminal window:

curl -O http://phix-project.org/installers/debian-6.sh ; su -c 'bash debian-6.sh'

This command downloads a simple shell script (which you can find on GitHub if you want to read it before trying it!), which is then run as the user “root”. The shell script:

  • Makes sure that you have a suitable version of PHP installed
  • Uses apt-get to install required dependencies
  • Uses the pecl command to install PHP extensions that we can’t get packaged for Debian
  • Upgrades the PEAR installer to the latest version
  • Installs the package phix/phix4componentdev, plus dependencies, from the PEAR channel pear.phix-project.org

If all goes well, once everything has finished, run the following command and you’ll see that phix is now installed:

$ pear list -c phix | grep phix
phix                       0.13.2  stable
phix4componentdev          0.13.2  stable

Where To Find The Latest Installation Instructions

You can always find the latest installation instructions for phix on the Phix project’s website, including full instructions on how to do a manual install if you have trouble with our one-line installer.

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